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Believing these 9 myths about negotiation prevents you from growing

People who are not used to negotiations are afraid to negotiate because they’re influenced by several common myths of the trade. These are ingrained and widespread, yet this doesn’t mean they’re true. Believing unfounded allegations and claims with no meaning can stop you from growing in business. Nobody knows everything at the bargaining table, and this is a fact. But you must learn to mold your demands, expectations, and needs in order to close a successful deal. Here are 9 myths you might want to avoid though.

1. Negotiation is about winning or losing

This is probably the most common myth about negotiations. A lot of people wrongfully assume that bargaining for something is about winning or losing, and that there’s no other alternative. Well, there is and it is called a win-win solution. Successful deals can happen even when all the parties involved compromise to reach an agreement.

Tips 9 Myths

2. Negotiation is a natural-born skill

False! It can’t be a natural-born skill. Negotiation is a skill that has to be learned in order to be mastered. The more you bargain with people and close deals (good ones and bad ones) the higher chances to have to gain experience and become a professional. A lot of people wrongfully presume that excellent negotiators are born and not made. They’re wrong! One needs years and years of practice before they can master this art.

3. Negotiators must be aggressive to win

Another myth that has been debunked over and over again; aggressiveness can help and it is often used by business people to take charge and intimidate opponents, but this is not the best approach to use when you want to win in negotiation. An assertive attitude can backfire. It could have many negative effects, thus convincing opponents to disagree and even walk away from a negotiation.

4. Lying can help you get out of a challenging situation

Believe it or not, a lot of people lie in business. This practice is used when an opponent has questions for you that you can’t answer. Making stuff up and bragging with unreal achievements has negative effects in the long term. Telling lies, or resorting to some other unethical negotiation strategies, will eventually make an opponent lose trust. Why should you put your credibility and reputation in jeopardy when you can just be honest?

5. Being nice means you are naïve

There’s no such thing as naiveté in business. And yet there are people who believe that nice guys end up last. That’s not the case. A kind, optimistic and positive attitude at the negotiation table doesn’t exude innocence; it says a lot about a person’s character. He/she may be nice on the outside, but likability can’t be translated into stupidity. Let’s not judge people after first appearances!

6. Negotiation is about winning more money

No, it’s not! Unfortunately, many still believe that walking to a business negotiation is all about getting more money than your opponent. Negotiating also means giving non-financial things up to get non-financial incentives in return; certain companies would rather end a deal with a mutual collaboration, a long-term partnership rather than receive more money, walk away and never speak to that company again.

Tips 9 Myths negotiation

7. Win-win deals are for losers

Associating win-win deals with loss is a mistake. In fact, a mutual agreement can bring a lot more benefits than a win-lose. Some companies want to negotiate in the hopes of building connections; In this case win-win deals means that you compromised but have invested in a long-term cooperation that could help you become more famous and improve bottom line.

8. Negotiation has clear rules one must follow

There’s no exact recipe for success in business negotiations. Yes, there are strategies one may choose to use, but most of the time people go with their gut. They act on an instinct, although they do with poise, determination and professionalism. It is important to enter meetings prepared; but success is not guaranteed of you adhere to the rules without adapting to a given scenario.

9. Negotiating is simple/difficult

Some people dread negotiations, others love them. In either case, you are never advised to take things for granted. A negotiation may seem easy/difficult on the outside, but prior to jumping in make sure you are prepared with facts. That’s all you need to succeed. Making assumptions can have a lot of negative effects. A certain deal may appear easy to close; be careful and whatever you do, don’t lose your temper.

 

Professional post By Jason Phillips and TheGapPartnership.com!

How to create a newsletter that is a good read

Whether it targets customers, colleagues or other interested parties: an e-mail newsletter can be an extremely effective communication tool – provided that it is opened and read.

However, for a newsletter to be opened and read, or even – in the best case – to be looked forward to instead of just flooding the inbox, there are two important basic rules:

1) You shall not bore!

2) You shall not spam!

If put into practice, this means that a newsletter is not a waste product of old, existing texts; there needs to be an editorial staff in charge! Its contents need to be tailored to its reader’s interests and the topics covered should be both, informative and entertaining for the recipient.

Effective Newsletter

To ensure that the newsletter is a success, the first step is a precise definition of the target group.

Who do I want to reach, who should be receiving information?

Who should know what about the organization, the company?

In the second step, there are two questions to be answered – which, admittedly, is not always easy:

What are the target group’s interests?

Which content will provide additional benefit to the readers?

What will entertain or amuse the target group, which contents should be included in the editorial plan?

Lastly, use a proper style of writing and an appealing and reader friendly layout (a no-go is bright font on dark background, for example), and there is your newsletter that is a good read.

P.S: Integrated links provide additional benefits. Also, readers like to be entertained – however, please do not (!) desperately try to be funny.

Dr. Annegret Haffa

Dr. Annegret Haffa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Text by Dr. Annegret Haffa. @drhaffa
http://www.haffapartner.de
Click here to access the Agency Blog

Localizing instead of Translating: How to make international press releases work

Multinational companies often face the challenge to distribute news from the headquarter based in foreign countries e.g. in the USA in other markets “with other languages as well. However, running the English piece through google translater and brush up the language a little bit, won’t do the trick. For making an adaption work properly, it needs to be way more than just a simple translation. Obviously the language is very important, but also some other aspects have to be kept in mind:

1. Topic: Before adapting the press release one question needs to be answered: Is this news really relevant for my market? Spreading news from the US headquarter does not always make sense, because not all topics are also relevant in markets like Germany, and sometimes a solution is just not available outside the US .

2. Structure: US press releases often start off very “softly” before getting to the point. These introductions “platitudes, trend-analyses or the like“ in the first paragraph(s) can be quite deterring for the German media. German journalists spend very little time on deciding whether a news piece is interesting to them or not. A press release which does not get to the point quickly won’t catch the attention of a German journalist and falls through the cracks. Therefore, in German press releases don’t waste any time and space: What’s most important, comes first!

International News

International News

3. Marketing-Talk: In a professional environment, Germans in general present theirselves more reserved than for examples US-Americans. The praising of products and services with superlatives is a taboo to German media. Every provider or manufacturer claims that his innovations are “unique” and that its success will be unprecedented. The challenge lies in stressing the actual benefits, without turning the German message into sweet talk oder adulation.

4. Quotations: US press releases often contain a lot of quotations that basically all say the same. For a successful localization, it is more useful to offer not more than one or two quotations (which cover all important messages) coming from a regional (!) speaker.

5. Customer References: The best testimonial of a satisfied customer is worthless, if the corresponding company is completely unknown in the target country. Therefore it makes sense to make use of less, but local references “ in Germany from the DACH-region or at least from internationally well-known companies.

In Germany, claiming to be “the leading provider” of anything should be proved. Because this is a rather difficult undertaking (e.g. because of lacking evidence and information) it is more secure to position oneself of being “one of the leading providers. On another note: There is no need for (registered) trademark references and legal disclaimers in Germany.

If you want to know why uniform communication does not work have a look at my colleague’s blog post covering examples of Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The rules for the “DACH” region or for the US also apply to other countries. Despite the geographical proximity, press releases from France, Italy or Spain cannot simply be translated into German “at least, if you want to get positive attention from a maximum of journalists”.

Markets can be compared just as little as you can compare apples to oranges. This is why PR professionals should not try to capture the attention of the local press with news that were obviously written for another target market. Hence, for adequate localization not only perfect foreign language competence is absolutely crucial, but also detailed knowledge of the local markets and industries.

Annegret

Dr.Annegret Haffa

 

Text by Dr. Annegret Haffa. @drhaffa
http://www.haffapartner.de
Click here to access the Agency Blog

Developing an Effective Social Media Measurement Strategy

There is no shortage of advice on how to engage people on social media. But how do you know if you are making an impact? Are your tweets and Facebook posts influencing potential customers, or are they landing with a thud? Clients want to see results, so you better have an answer for them when they inquire.

Developing a method to measure and track social media engagement is key to understanding how social is performing compared to other media. At PR News’ Digital PR Summit in San Francisco on Wednesday, Maria Saltz, senior manager for social media analytics at Adobe, shared important points to remember when tracking visitor engagement with content to prove the value of your social media strategy.

  • Define business objectives and goals. This includes getting input from a number of groups, including the executive team, marketing, sales, production and customer support. Ask questions and set expectations.
  • Determine KPIs that show business impact. Key performance indicators are quantifiable and actionable. They measure factors that are critical to the organization’s success and are tied to business goals and targets.
  • Measure the value of your campaign. Use campaign codes in the URLs for each post. Employ social analytics tools to follow traffic from social content.
  • Track the long-term impact of engagement. Break down site visitors that have been referred by social sites or specific campaigns to understand the impact of visitor engagement with social content.

Don’t leave your social media strategy to chance and hope that it all works out. When armed with meaningful data, you will have the power to adjust your strategy to improve success and avoid failure.

By @RickBrownell

6 Media Pitching Do’s—and 1 Don’t

Getting journalists and other influencers in your market to respond to your story pitches comes down, as they say, to building relationships. This takes time—years, in fact—and time may not be what you have much of these days. Perhaps you need to get someone to respond to a pitch within the next three hours.

These six tactical media pitching do’s (and one media pitching don’t) from Jane Carpenter, head of public relations for online home products and furnishings retailer Wayfair, and a presenter at PR News’ Jan. 28 “Pitching the Media” webinar, will help see you through the anxiety of short deadlines and high media placement expectations.

1. DO invest in great photography and send images with every announcement.

2. DO get your CEO and key execs on Twitter (if only to engage with journalists).

3. DO keep meticulous records on all reporter touch points and history.

4. DO take advantage of every time your CEO or execs are in a key media city (San Francisco, New York) to squeeze in in-person meetings.

5. DO insist on time with top execs to brainstorm new media angles and pick their brains for insight or news they may have discovered in their regular interaction with other industry leaders.

6. DON’T get in the way if a reporter wants direct access to your company’s top executives but DO stay in the loop on all interaction.

There’s still time to register for the Jan. 28 webinar “Pitching the Media: How to Cut Through the Clutter.” Wayfair’s Jane Carpenter will be joined by Beth Monaghan, principal and co-founder of InkHouse, and Tracy Schario, communications officer and clean energy lead for the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Text by Steve Goldstein: @SGoldsteinAI