Archive for Advertising

104 Facts You Don’t Know About Mobile Marketing

Mobile marketing currently represents one of the newest forms of digital marketing present on the market. For those who do not know, it provides customers with personalised information, promoting services, goods and ideas. The technique has been regarded as any marketing activity that is conducted through a network that mobile users are constantly connected to.

Some of the main benefits associated with mobile marketing include the possibility to send location and time-sensitive pieces of information, via a wide variety of channels, including push notifications, app-based marketing, QR codes, SMS, MMS, Bluetooth, in-game mobile advertising, voice email and even through automated calls. As we live in the era of smartphones, mobile marketing carried out via push notifications is essential to promoting services, establishing brand loyalty, encouraging people to purchase products or services, but also making sure that existing customers return to buy more.

In this particular infographic compiled by the team behind Website Builder, you will be able to find 104 interesting facts that you don’t know about mobile marketing, including desktop vs. mobile comparisons, niches that work best, great mobile marketing techniques, but also usage, user friendliness, adoption, commerce, search and conversion stats.

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Professional Guest post by Website Builder WebsiteBuilder.org

Three display Advertising issues to watch in 2016

Digital advertising has emerged as a large-scale business and revenue generated through digital advertising is expected to exceed $150bn in the year 2016.

And even though an exact amount that accounts for the cost of display ads globally is hard to calculate, it is around 50% of the money spent on digital advertising.

With such grand costs, display advertising poses its fine share of issues and problems to advertisers.

Apprehension about how ads are delivered, where they go, and how ad views are priced makes marketers hesitant to continue investing as heavily as the campaign requires in order to reach a maximum.

To help such marketers reach a decision, I have summed up three of the main issues digital display advertising had to face in 2015 – and what you might have to tackle within 2016 whether for clients as advertising agency or an individual.

  1. Ad blocking

stop-blog-comvortThe issue in 2015

Ad blocking technology has been met with raised eyebrows for as long as it has been available in the market. After only a couple of years of its release, in 2010, Exonsultancy was shamming ad blocking for killing site Ars Technology in their blogs and article. (Ars Technology surprisingly survived!)

The issue resurfaced in 2015 when Apple enabled ad blockers to work their way into the App Store.

Suddenly, advertisers feared that this threat to an entire niche of digital advertising would run rampant among other sites and companies as well.

The PageFair and Adobe report furthered this concern by showing that ad blocking software usage increased a good 41% year-on-years from Q2 2014 to Q2 2015.

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This meant that presently the number of people using an ad block was 198m, bringing about a loss of $41.8bn loss in online ad revenue by 2016, as shown in the report.

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Image source: theascent.biz

 

What to watch for in 2016

According to a report from Harvard University Neiman Journalism Lab, considerably fewer people employed an ad block on mobile.

Publishers kept from giving exact figures, but Nieman Lab claimed that according to most responses of tests and surveys conducted the share of mobile ads being blocked was about ‘1 or 2 percent’.

Not even close to the ‘admageddon’ feared by advertisers.

Neiman Lab did call desktop ad blocking a prevalent issue, with 77m Europeans and 45m Americans using ad blocking software, according to the PageFair report.

But, new technologies which give publishers the option to hide content from users which have ad blocks on have come to being.

If publishers continue to use this technology, hopefully the issue will find a way on its own and digital ads revenue wouldn’t have to experience a loss as big as $41.8bn this year.

  1. Ad Viewability

The issue in 2015

In August, the Media Rating Council posted its latest viewability guidelines:

The current industry standard for a viewable display ad impression is a minimum of 50% of pixels in view for at least one second, and for a viewable digital video ad impression, a minimum of 50% of pixels must be in view for at least two continuous seconds.

The IAB is contended with this definition of standard. In an interview in September, the IAB CEO Randall Rothenberg said, “Debate side [of viewability] is over now and that it’s up to the publishers to implement the standards.”

These standards meant marketers will have to buy ads with new dimensions, because of a ‘viewable CPM’ (vCPM) which leaves advertisers with only the option to buy ads which can be viewed.

vCPMs are already available for purchase on Google Display network.

What to watch out for in 2016

Not all were pleased by MRC/IAB definition. A survey of senior digital execs by ClickZ in September showed that hardly one third of respondents find the MRC standard to suffice their particular need.

Also, Google declared its support for vCPMs by claiming to aim for 100% viewable pixels and advising advertisers to not invest in unviewable ads at all. Google went as far in its support as changing all the CPM campaigns to vCPM ones.

Facebook too followed suit and signaled advertisers that it would charge for only 100% viewable ads. Facebook will involve a third party, Moat’s verification services, for video ads.

But Econsultancy’s Patricio Robles highlights a point to ponder in a recent article on this topic, “Advertisers should ultimately be basing their investment decisions on whether or not the media they’re buying is moving the needle or not.”

This statement suggests that segmenting your audiences and measuring properly on the back end leaves advertisers unharmed by viewability in many respects.

However, if your ads are not being displayed on a platform, its only understandable to draw back funding from that platform.

  1. Inappropriate Ad Placement

The issue in 2015

An inappropriate placement was the third major issue that appeared in 2015.

When the purchase of display ads is based entirely on programs, they may be placed at unfavorable positions because of placing by interest or keyword.

Comvort Blog

Image source: www.newsiosity.com

 

This problem is also faced by brands with advertisers indulged in unethical activities. This Singtel is showing up on a site which offers illegal streaming of sporting events.

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Image source: https://econsultancy.com/

 

This can pose an issue of considerable magnitude to brands and businesses.

In a recent AppNexus survey in APAC, programmatic buying was met with hesitance owing to the ‘the fear of adverts appearing on undesirable sites’ and other significant issues such as the ‘lack of transparency on where advertisements end up’.

Image source: Image source: https://econsultancy.com/

Image source: Image source: https://econsultancy.com/

 

What to watch out for in 2016

Pixalate is a data platform created for the sole purpose of introducing transparency to programmatic ad buying. It built a ranking index for the display ad sellers depending on the quality of the ad they produced.

That offered some help to big ad buyers in having some idea of the sites their ad would be displayed on. However, still the safest way to be sure that your ads don’t appear in the wrong place is manually blacklisting the sites you want to keep distance with.

As Singtel told Mumbrella, “As new sites are constantly introduced, we regularly update our exclusion list to ensure that we only run advertising on relevant and appropriate websites.

We are reviewing the process to ensure that advertising only appears on suitable sites.

Beside these issues…

Display advertising is a great means of creating product awareness and will continue to be so in 2016.

The problems this market has seen; ad blocking, viewability, and even publisher quality are being addressed to some extent.

These issues can have varying impacts on different brands for as long as they prevail. But even in 2016, nothing can outdo high-quality back-end analytics in figuring out return on ad spend.

Professional Guest post by Junaid Ali Qureshi

5 tips to bring your global brand to a local audience

If your market is becoming increasingly saturated you might consider growing your business further afield. Take care though, what works in your native country might not always work in a foreign market.

Here are 5 tips to localise your global marketing campaigns.

  1. Think global – act human:
    A global company like Coca-Cola have their marketing campaigns revolve around people enjoying their products. The universal message used to frame this perceived emotion was ‘Always Coca-Cola’ which was then translated into different languages but the core message wasn’t the same. A more recent campaign was the ‘Share a Coke’ campaign which was first trialled in Australia and New Zealand in 2011 and saw a 7% increase in sales. This campaign was then subsequently rolled out globally. The message is simple and couldn’t possibly offend anyone.
  2. Research: When Proctor & Gamble first launched Pamper nappies in Japan it had a stork delivering a baby on the packaging. This packaging was effective in the U.S. but sales struggled in Japan as parents became confused by the image of the stork. It is recommended that you review your marketing collateral before launching your products in a foreign country.

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  1. Streamline content:
    To ensure your brand is visually consistent globally it is worth putting effort in creating assets, campaign resources and brand guidelines that can be used everywhere.
  2. Adapt to local marketing expectations:
    Expectations will vary per culture, for instance in the U.S. delivery is a key performance indicator and they prefer their goods to be delivered quickly, whereas France is much more focused on quality and delivery isn’t as much of an issue. Highlight these aspects in your communication.
  3. Global world: With social media messages spreading across the world much quicker – your cousin in the U.S., for instance, might complain about his level of service and you maybe based in the UK and this will still pop up on your time line. Customer service should be key and a global effort.

If you are looking to launch your campaign on a global level get in touch with your Comvort local agency partner today.

Professional Guest post by OWB-UK. (Agency Comvort Member since 2009).

How do you have better conversations with people all over the world?

Communication is key to success. The world is more connected than ever before and sending an email is done in less than a minute. Even though communication has never been so instantaneous, you may still face some communication challenges.

By hiring a Comvort agency, you benefit from local teams positioned globally that have a wealth of experience communicating and dealing with your market.

Follow a few of Comvorts handy tips to overcome your specific cultural communication barriers:

The Swiss pursue non-aggressive, minimal bargaining methods, using their standards of quality as negation tools. This secures them good deals while maintaining a friendly business relationship.

In Hungary they hinge around unpredictable styles veering between co-operation and raising problems, before everyone talks at once to secure agreement on several points.

In the Netherlands, The Dutch corporate culture proceeds at an analytical pace without overt haggling or rushing, through which they lay solid factual foundations before establishing business consensus.

The Chinese use meetings as information gathering sessions, though final decisions are made elsewhere. They often play the ‘huge market’ card and fight for win-win solutions.

The Hong Kong business culture values time as highly as results and so eloquence is supported by quick concessions to close a deal faster.

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Australians prefer conducting business in a frank conversational style, to achieve friendly agreements reached through creative solutions and mutual comprise.

In Israel they are often highly logical. In business, they prefer direct approaches with clearly outlined proposals, before finalising deals supported by pragmatic conclusions.

In the UK they prefer to build up to professional matters, first establishing a rapport after and after that tend to stall while negotiating.

Professional Guest post by Agency OWB-UK.
Comvort Member since 2009.

*(Source: http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/global-communication-tips)

How marketing Initiatives Sharpen Your Organisation

Advertising is a facet of marketing and separate from other marketing concepts. Although most individuals use these terms interchangeably, it is important to remember that these business terminologies actually have specific distinctions that using one term in lieu of the other is like calling apples “oranges” or vice versa. Doing so is misguided or ill-informed.

So what exactly differentiates advertising from other marketing activity? To put it simply, while advertising can be mostly concerned with branding or imaging, other marketing is geared toward directly tapping target clients for the purpose of sales generation. Advertising can be about making a good first impression. Other marketing, on the other hand, is fueled by an organisation’s desire to do business.

 

In these times of economic flux, it is not always easy for organisations, especially smaller ones, to sustain both advertising and other marketing efforts. Marketing often requires major investment, and is apparently counterproductive to cost-reduction initiatives, which most businesses are keen on nowadays. With this said, it is crucial for organisations to prioritise, with objectivity and a sense of practicality. Zeroing in on business development with limited funds call for creativity and persistence—these are competencies essential to marketing. Arguably, marketing should be favoured as opposed to just advertising, at least during times when both cannot be sustained financially.

Here are ways to strengthen marketing efforts:

  • Get to know your market:

Sales simply mean having people to pay willingly for whatever you are offering. For these potential customers to even entertain shelling out their hard earned money in exchange for your product or service, they must, first and foremost find your offer/s personally relevant. Producing market-specific or market-relevant products or services is the first step to business development. This can be done by accomplishing thorough market research that will not only create an exhaustive profile of your target market, but also, reveal their specific wants and needs.

  • Employ multi-media marketing:

Customers access information from all types of media; from television to laptops to mobile devices. The options run the gamut. For your business development efforts to be noticed by prospective customers, it is best that you keep up with their communication proclivities. It is not enough to sustain marketing efforts via email marketing when employment of social networks can be just as competitive and results-driven.

  • Referral:

Although this can be considered as a traditional marketing approach, it is never obsolete. Referral marketing is a reliable means for a business development driven organisation to actually reach its target customers. There are many strategies inherent to this approach, including Pay for Performance, Incentive-Centred Referrals, and the likes. Moreover, make sure to reward, or at least show some appreciation toward failed referrals. A simple thank you email or note will do and this does not require monetary investment.

  • Networking:

One way to ensure that business development is on full-throttle is to engage every team member in the initiative. This means that everyone should be in-the-know with regards to current marketing efforts, and are equipped with at least the basic sales competencies, so as when they are out doing business or personal functions, they can efficiently take on even unexpected sales opportunities.

 

Text by Nicholas Hill, a modern thought leader and international Trainer of strategic leadership skills and management training.

Managing Director & Principal Trainer for The Hill Consultancy Ltd.

@nicholashill