Archive for 6 December, 2011

Safe advertising is the riskiest advertising of all (Bill Bernbach)

Interesting and inspiring “Manifesto for Experimentation” written by Joseph Jaffe, one of the most sought-after consultants, speakers and thought leaders on new marketing. Mr. Jaffe is President and Chief Interruptor of Crayon, a new marketing company. Crayon is a mash-up of 5 key areas: strategic and creative agency services, consulting, M&A Advisory, thought leadership/custom publishing, and finally training/education. Crayon’s initial clients include The Coca-Cola Company, GSD&M and SpiralFrog.

Joseph Jaffe is the author of  the book “Life After the 30-Second Spot”.

Here we share a segment of this Manifesto which you can download from Jafee Juice.

“We are living through and operating in unprecedented times—exciting, challenging and anything but stagnant or predictable. Marketing as we know it (or knew it) is undergoing tremendous growing pains, embarking on a rather forced journey of both evolution and revolution from the shores of the status quo to the promised land of the future.

The overarching hypothesis is simple: the world has changed; the consumer has changed; the organization has not. Technology is, or as, change agent. The consumer is changing, but the marketing discipline resists or refuses to change.

The result is a disconnect. A gap. A chasm that has to be bridged.

To be successful, marketing organizations will need to foster and adopt an aggressive and intense culture of experimentation, risk-taking, change management (for communications) and creativity.

Anything less will result in relative business losses, competitive inferiority and inefficient allocation of resources (and therefore sub-optimal return on investment).

Here’s one way you can take a risk and try something different:

The Four Key Principles to Changing the Status Quo

1. An Experiment is a set of actions and observations, performed in the context of solving a particular problem or question, to support or falsify a hypothesis or research concerning phenomena. The experiment is a cornerstone in the empirical approach to acquiring deeper knowledge about the physical world.

2. Change, the quality of impermanence and the flux, has had a checkered history as a concept. In ancient Greek philosophy, while Heraclitus saw change as ever-present and allencompassing, Parmenides virtually denied its existence. Ovid produced a classic thematic handling of change as metamorphosis in his Metamorphoses. Change may require organisms and organizations to adapt (see also evolution).

3. Creativity (or creativeness) is a mental process involving the generation of new ideas or concepts, or new associations between existing ideas or concepts. Unlike many phenomena in science, there is no single, authoritative perspective or definition of creativity. Unlike many phenomena in psychology, there is no standardized measurement technique. This mysterious phenomena, though undeniably important and constantly visible, seems to lie tantalizingly beyond the grasp of most people.

“ Creativity, it has been said, consists largely of re-arranging what we know in order to find out what we do not know.” ~ George Keller

4. Risk is the potential harm that may arise from some present process or from some future event. In everyday usage, “risk” is often used synonymously with “probability”, but in professional risk assessments, risk combines the probability of a negative event occurring with how harmful that event would be. Financial risk is often defined as the unexpected variability or volatility of returns, and thus includes both potential worse than expected as well as better than expected returns.”

Sources: Wikipedia